Hasperat souffle

Using food to assist breaking people out of prison is not new; after all, the whole ‘bring a visitor a pie/cake with a razor blade inside’ trick goes back to at least the 19th century. However, it takes a special type of thinker (Quark) to acknowledge the possibilities of using a souffle to assist in the prison break-out process (DS9: Sacrifice of Angels). 

This souffle is a variation on the more traditional cheese souffle, using hasperat in the place of the cheese. You’ll need to start a week in advance if you don’t have any hasperat on hand (I probably shouldn’t admit this, but I do often have hasperat in the house!). The hasperat is distributed evenly throughout the souffle and giving a nice flavour. My souffle fell a bit as I was taking photos but if you serve it straight away it will be nice and fluffy. 

Replicate your own
(Makes 1 large souffle or 4-6 small ones)

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An edible tribute to Janice Rand (braided lattice bread)

Yeoman Janice Rand. Maker of coffee and diet salads, artist and efficient worker. And also the person with probably the best hairstyle on the Enterprise. Yeoman Rand’s hair was one of the things that fascinated me when I first watched The Original Series, and I marvelled at how much work it would have been to maintain. Naturally, this meant I had to create an edible version of her braided lattice hair.

This is a standard bread recipe that you then plait or braid. Normally, plaited breads are divided into 6-8 strands and actually plaited together. I took the instructions used to create lattice pie tops and used this to create this lattice bread. The great thing about this bread is that you can tear off individual pieces to eat as small dinner rolls, or cut larger slices and toast them. I’ll post full process photos on the Facebook page so you can see all the steps in weaving the bread together. 

Replicate your own 
(Makes 1 loaf of bread which can be pulled apart into about 20 small rolls)
(Based on Paul Hollywood’s recipe for plaited bread)

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Makara fizz

Going into a holodeck can sometimes be a confusing experience. People dress funny, the scenery is weird, and sometimes they don’t even have your favourite drink on offer. This is the situation Kesha found herself in, when accompanying Jake to the holodeck to visit Nog (DS9: It’s Only a Paper Moon). As we know, the reason the drink wasn’t served was because they were at Vic Fontaine’s, and to the loss of everyone and in particular the local bar scene, the makara fizz was not known in Las Vegas. 

It was definitely a loss, as this cocktail is delicious. It is essentially a gin fizz, but with bay leaf syrup replacing the plain sugar syrup normally used. This is the first time I’ve made bay leaf simple syrup and it was so tasty I’m definitely going to make it again. You can use the same method for making any herbal simple syrup - I think they are great to have around and flavour cocktails. If Vic Fontaine ever had a taste of a makara fizz, I’m sure he’d add it to the menu at his lounge immediately. 

Replicate your own
(Makes 1 cocktail)

45ml / 1.5fl oz (3 parts) Gin
30ml / 1fl oz (2 parts) Fresh lemon juice
20ml / 0.7fl oz (1.5 parts) Bay leaf simple syrup (recipe below)
80ml / 2.7fl oz (5 parts) Soda water
Icecubes

Add the gin, lemon juice and bay leaf simple syrup to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake vigorously until the outside of the shaker is cold to the touch. 

Fill a highball glass with icecubes. Strain the mix in the shaker into the glass, and top with soda water. Garnish with a fresh bay leaf. 

To make the bay leaf simple syrup:
6-8 fresh bay leaves (do not used dried)
100g / 3.5oz sugar
100ml / 3.4fl oz water

Put the bay leaves, sugar and water in a saucepan and heat over medium heat, stirring occasionally until the sugar is dissolved. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 3-4 minutes. 

Remove from the heat and allow to cool, leaving the bay leaves in the syrup until it is completely cooled. 

Store in a sterilised container in the fridge or at room temperature. 

Blueberry pancakes

We’ll ease into the recipes for this year. I’m not asking you to cook up a horrific Klingon dish this early in the new year! Instead, why not try these blueberry pancakes - we all know they’re delicious, and so does Doctor Phlox (ENT: Unexpected). Unfortunately, T’Pol is not so keen, given that she had not yet got used to living with humans, let alone eating their food. Suspicious Vulcans aside, these pancakes are sure to please most visiting species who have dropped in for breakfast. 

I like thick, fluffy pancakes, so the batter I used is quite thick. If you prefer thinner pancakes, increase the amount of milk to get a thinner batter. I used fresh blueberries but you could certainly use frozen ones instead. 

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Replicate your own
(Makes 10-12 med-large pancakes)

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No new post this week

Even food replicators need a break every now and again. In the meantime, check out the process photos from making the insignia roll cake last week, now up on the facebook page!

Back next week with more awesome replicated recipes!

Starfleet Roll Call (patterned roll cake)

What better way to make sure all your cadets have returned from the holidays than with this Starfleet Roll Call cake?! This cake will keep all your cadets in line as well as providing a delicious dessert for the officers. 

The method used for this cake can be used to make any pattern to go on the outside of your roll cake. Much like “Mirror, Mirror”, remember to reverse your design to start with so that it ends up the right way on the final cake. I filled my roll with pistachio flavoured buttercream, but you can use a variety of fillings including ganache or whipped cream.

Replicate your own
(Makes a roll cake which serves 6-8 people)
(Method and recipe from How To Cook That)

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For Christmas: Neelix’s Fruit Compote (Rumtopf)

I realise that Christmas isn’t really celebrated in the Star Trek Universe, but if it was, Neelix would be leading the celebrations. He’d be the one putting up the decorations as soon as possible and organising a Christmas carol singalong in front of the holodeck fireside. And of course he would be making all sorts of deletable Christmas treats, including his famous fruit compote (VOY: Mortal Coil).

In this case, the fruit compote is made by soaking fruits in alcohol for several weeks or even months - as Captain Janeway notes, it can sometimes be so strong that people get lightheaded. I have therefore taken inspiration for Neelix’s fruit compote from the traditional German dish known as a Rumtopf, where fruits are soaked in rum, sugar and spices for months before being opened and consumed at Christmas time. It is quite strong and not for the faint-hearted, but will definitely improve everyone’s Christmas cheer. I am sure Neelix would approve!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all you wonderful readers! I hope your days are filled with happiness, friendship - and Star Trek, of course. 

Replicate your own
(Makes 1 Rumtopf which will easily serve 10-15 people)

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Pasta Boudin

I can’t be the only one who wants to eat at Sisko’s. The food always looks fabulous, and of course the owner/cook/host seems great fun. As far as I am aware, Sisko’s remains proudly replicator free and prepares all recipes from scratch. As for this recipe - in the words of Joseph Sisko - “it’s got a kick but it will make you smile!” - what more can you ask for in a dish?!

This dish is a literal combination of pasta and boudin sausage filling. And I must say it is a great combination! I made the pasta from scratch but you could of course use store-bought. You will end up with far more boudin mixture than you need to serve with the pasta - but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Use it with more pasta, spread it on toast or just eat it by itself. In all cases, I guarantee it will make you smile. 

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Replicate your own
(Serves 2 as a pasta dish; makes about 5 cups of boudin mixture)
(Boudin mixture based on the recipe from the Homesick Texan; pasta recipe from Ruhlman’s Ratio). 

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Vulcan Spice Tea

Although this spice tea is clearly enjoyed by Tuvok and Captain Janeway (VOY: Alliances), I would also like to think that it is a common drink on all of Vulcan, because it is refreshing, spicy and logical all at the same time. I am a little suprised to see Janeway drink anything other than coffee, but can understand why a coffee drinker would enjoy the strong flavours of this tea. 

While I have listed quantities of spices below, the recipe is very flexible - if you want more of any spices, feel free to add it! Remember to steep your spices for a few minutes to allow the flavours to develop. It is a bit difficult to only make the amount of spice needed for a single cup, so I suggest you make the quantities below and store the mix in a jar - pre-made spice tea, whenever you want it! The recipe below does have quite a spicy finish - if you want to lower that a little, use less peppercorns and ground ginger. 

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Replicate your own
(Makes about 1/4 cup of the spice mixture)

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For Thanksgiving: Sisko’s stuffing with tarragon

Happy Thanksgiving to all those who will be celebrating it! This year, we’re headed to Deep Space Nine where Benjamin Sisko cooked a thanksgiving dinner for all the senior staff (DS9: Blaze of Glory). Of course, as with any Thanksgiving dinner, you can’t possibly satisfy everyone and in this case it was Michael Eddington who didn’t like the stuffing and felt that Sisko had used too much tarragon. 

To me, those are fighting words. I am a huge fan of tarragon and there’s not many situations where I’d think there was too much of it. I made this stuffing in a separate dish (which I recognise means it should be called dressing, not stuffing). You could also use this to stuff a turkey and cook it, but this may result in an overcooked bird while you are waiting for the stuffing to cook through. If you are one of those people who, like Michael Eddington who doesn’t like tarragon, you can always use sage or parsley instead. 

Replicate your own
(Serves 4-6 as part of a larger Thanksgiving spread)
(Based on Michael Ruhlman’s ratio for Thanksgiving dressing)

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